KORG ELECTRIBE ESX-1 MANUAL PDF

Patterns — patterns preloadMaximum steps by part, Maximum 24 motion sequence by pattern. Convenient sample-editing functions If you want to save the edits that you leectribe to sample, you must Write it before you switch to another sample or turn off the power. Creating A Song Creating a song You can create a song by arranging patterns in the desired order. Pattern Set is a function that lets you assign your favorite patterns to each of the sixteen step keys, and select these patterns by press- ing the appropriate key. The edits you make to each of the effects processors can be saved with each pattern. Effect types The effects of the ESX-1 can be classified into kofg following three groups.

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Pictures do not do it justice. In terms of knobs and buttons, the ESX1 is lavishly specified, offering 69 buttons and 17 knobs, a slider and a ribbon controller. The latter two controls are for the brilliant and intuitive hands-on arpeggiator, which I raved about in the EMX1 review. The new Electribe also features a pair of highly visible, backlit, Russian-made Electro Harmonix 12AX7 valves, which are able to add no small amount of real analogue fuzziness and warmth to its sound.

Samples can, however, be manipulated with a similarly abbreviated set of subtractive synthesis tools as those offered by the EMX1.

Without any samples loaded, the ESX1 is mute. A SmartMedia socket is provided for external sample storage to cards of up to Mb in size. Perfect for adding, and controlling, the audio from an EMX1 or what? You can even arpeggiate the audio input track! The effects and arpeggiator are also identical.

Nine drum Parts plus five others, each marrying a sound source with one track of sequencing, are used to record Patterns of up to eight bars in length, in step or real time, with the Patterns chainable into complete Songs.

As mentioned above, though, the EMX1 needs to have samples in it before you can start creating those Songs. The sampler section can record or import mono or stereo samples, at bit resolution and a sample rate of In view of this fact, it might have been nice if Korg had supplied a card with the machine.

If you want more than mono samples, a Well done! Stereo sampling is always an option, but stand by for some compromises on this front. Using the scratch calculation of around 10Mb of storage needed for every minute of bit stereo digital audio at Even if data reduction was used, there would not really be any cause for concern: Roland, for example, have developed an entire dynasty of digital multitracks which depend on data-reduction technology. Effect type is chosen via a chunky knob.

Photo: Mike Cameron Once created or loaded and edited if needed — more later , samples can be assigned to one of the Pattern Parts, of which there are Between them, they handle samples in four distinct ways.

From the left of the front panel there are nine Drum Parts, labelled , 6A, 6B, 7A and 7B, with each of the last two pairs not triggerable at the same time, to help simulate hi-hats and other similar rhythmic devices. The most obvious choice of samples for these two Parts would be those suitable for melodic playback. Samples assigned here can be played with sustaining loops.

Two Parts can be assigned Stretched samples. In practice, this DSP-based trick is a little limited — large variations in tempo, in either direction, will not always be terribly faithful, though the effect may well be effective in any case!

There is but one Slice Part, and this is a simple take on the Propellerhead Recycle idea of dividing a sample into discrete segments, each of which is then triggered by a MIDI event. However, tempo changes of many BPM in either direction are acceptable. Now for a few words about stereo samples.

They introduce compromises, the main one being that the use of them results in the loss of Parts. The same compromise is true for the two Stretch Parts. The Factory Set Though the ESX1 is aimed at people who want to create music with their own samples, it comes filled with a factory set of samples and Patterns. Setting instrumental samples to loop from start to end also results in a seamless loop, which is helpful. Patterns are provided by Korg, too, though their number is a bit confusing: the promo blurb at the start of the manual says , whereas the Pattern name list at the back of the manual shows just Whatever the case, there are Pattern locations, all of which can be filled with your own work, plus 64 Song memories.

The factory examples show off a large number of contemporary styles, with some remarkable programming and ingenious use of the factory samples. Sampling The sampling process itself is separate from the deployment of samples within Patterns but is as straightforward to access as any other aspect of the instrument.

Anyone new to sampling may need to take a little time to familiarise themselves with basic concepts, and the issues of setting input levels, managing memory, and deciding what a decent loop point is, but the ESX1 is a good enough tool with which to learn.

As one might expect, mono or stereo samples can be recorded from external audio, either manually or via an automatic level-sensing option. Resampling will capture any Motion Sequences more later recorded into a Pattern, plus any changes you make live during the sampling process, which adds to the spontaneity of the process.

The computer-less amongst us could now do this entirely within a Korg-branded environment, if they own an ESX1. I did this and it worked perfectly. My one niggle is not a complaint about sampling the EMX1, but one about the way in which stereo samples are handled by the ESX1 — see the main body of the review for more. Helpfully, resampling of the mix starts in sync with the Pattern playback, so there will be no dead space at the start of the resulting sample.

Post sampling, the usual tools are available, including sample naming. A finished sample can have start and end points set, and a loop point added if desired, using a slightly unhelpful numeric display — the small LCD means no chance of graphic editing!

There seems to be no way to edit to zero crossings to minimise clicks , but one soon develops the aural tools necessary to sense or hear good start and end points, and, more importantly, a smooth loop. Once a sample is edited, any unwanted material outside the start and end points can be truncated. Normalisation is available, to optimise the level of any samples that might have been recorded too quietly.

Such samples will play back at the wrong pitch, so being able to tune over a wide range is welcome. Even so, this is not just a loop playback and drum-hit box, as the two Keyboard Parts reveal. Apparently, a simulated analogue drive circuit helps the filter produce a more convincing resonance peak, whilst avoiding digital clipping — so it sounds even more like an analogue filter than earlier Korg models — and the maximum cutoff frequency has been increased as a result of algorithm and sampling-frequency improvements.

The simple EG, controlled by one button and one knob, again proves its worth. New controls for the ESX1 are sample-specific: a start point offset knob, and a reverse button. Only two parameters per effect can be edited, though the choices are generally the right ones.

The three effects can be used independently, or linked in a two- or three-effect chain. The problem can be overridden via MIDI, but not on the machine alone, as it stands. Each Pattern of up to on board has a length of up to eight bars, and a choice of resolutions means that a bar can offer 16 16th-note steps, 16 32nd notes, 12 8th-note triplets or 12 16th-note triplets. Drum Parts can be triggered by their respective buttons — as if they were pads on a drum machine — and the strong strip of buttons at the bottom of the front panel shows the result by their lit or unlit state.

The buttons come into play again for triggering Stretched samples, or the individual Slices of a sample assigned to the Slice Track. If a Pattern is longer than one bar, a pair of buttons scrolls back and forth between bars, with you keeping track of where you are via a handy line of red LEDs. None of the buttons generates velocity information, though an Accent track allows Drum Parts only to have a little variety; unfortunately, the Accent is global for all drum hits: accent one beat, and all drum samples sounding on that beat will be accented.

Patterns are chained into a Song of which there may be up to 64 on board to create a finished piece. Equally, a single Pattern could be repeated for the length of the Song, since a certain amount of remixing and data overdubbing can be achieved in this mode.

The Arpeggiator Photo: Mike CameronThe interface of the interactive, hands-on arpeggiator was unique when introduced on the EMX1, but is now less so since two instruments feature it! Basically, the user can initiate synchronised arpeggiations of whatever Part they happen to be playing from the keyboard, at any time, by touching the ribbon controller on the left. Moving up and down the strip changes note length, whilst wiggling the adjacent slider at the same time transposes the effect through one of 31 preset scale types, over two octaves.

It works with just one key held down, or will arpeggiate whatever chord shape you create on the button keyboard, in the order you pressed the keys. Conclusion Criticisms about the Electribe SX are very few. However, I had an issue or two with the manual, and found that combing the table of contents is usually more helpful than the index. Also, in some cases it would have been nice to have an easy way to move backwards through the OS, since occasionally the only way to stop something you might have done by accident is to start the operation again.

This can be a bit annoying, since some processes take many button-pushes to achieve. Loading individual samples from SmartMedia card would also have been made more streamlined had the OS remained in the load screen between each sample. But the bottom line is that Korg have done it again: as easy as the EMX1 made synthesis, sequencing and rhythm programming, the Electribe SX makes acquiring samples, editing them to a certain extent and creating music with the result.

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Gurg The tube gain knob adjusts the level of the output signal manuall through the vacuum tubes, creating dynamic sounds with the distinctive tonal quality that only tubes deliver. Got it, continue to print. When you touch the ribbon controller, the selected part will begin playing automatically. Select the drum part that you want to play. Soloing a part 1.

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KORG ELECTRIBE ESX-1 MANUAL PDF

Pictures do not do it justice. In terms of knobs and buttons, the ESX1 is lavishly specified, offering 69 buttons and 17 knobs, a slider and a ribbon controller. The latter two controls are for the brilliant and intuitive hands-on arpeggiator, which I raved about in the EMX1 review. The new Electribe also features a pair of highly visible, backlit, Russian-made Electro Harmonix 12AX7 valves, which are able to add no small amount of real analogue fuzziness and warmth to its sound. Samples can, however, be manipulated with a similarly abbreviated set of subtractive synthesis tools as those offered by the EMX1. Without any samples loaded, the ESX1 is mute.

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Mikakree In addition to the xs of each part, a pattern contains effect settings and phrases, and can also record knob move- ments. The ESX-1 is the ideal tool for the mu- sician, DJ, sound creator, or desktop-music user who wants an easy way to add originality to their music. You can set the tempo this way even when the ESX-1 is stopped or paused. Two Accent parts introduce added dynamics.

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